New season starting

We hope to restart meetings in the Autumn

We need hardly note that the programme at the start of this year had to be abandoned so it is with pleasure that – tentatively at least – we hope to restart in the Autumn with a programme up to Christmas.  The first session will be on Monday 21 September and will be  The Legend of Orpheus and the Birth of Opera by Jeremy Barlow.

Starting at 7:30 as usual and at the usual place which if you haven’t been before is at the rear of the Guide’s Centre in St Ann St.  By car go down to the end of Exeter St and left before the roundabout into Carmalite Way.  Then left and almost back to St Ann St and there are some green gates on the left into a free car park.  Access is easy for those with disabilities.

It is a modest £3 for non-members.

Please keep an eye on this site or on Facebook in case we have to cancel.

Once we have finalised the remaining evenings we will post the full programme here.

Look forward to seeing you or welcoming new members in September!

Peter Curbishley

 

 

Rest of the season

Cancellation

Since our last email it has become clear that we are very unlikely to be able to resume any of our sessions this season, and so we have regretfully decided to cancel the rest of this season’s sessions.
We plan to re-schedule the two sessions with a presenter (Peter Horwood and Richard Langham Smith) into the 2020-21 season.
If it happens that things ease sufficiently in the next 2 months (one can but hope) we might look at arranging a session, perhaps a special members’ evening in June to round off the season.
The committee is endeavouring to prepare the 2020-21 programma which we hope will commence as usual in September 2020.
Meanwhile, I hope we all stay healthy and safe.

POSTPONED MEETING

We regret to say the meeting planned for Monday 23 March has been postponed because of the current Covid-19 situation.  Things are obviously changing fast – COBRA met this morning – so what happens in the future is in the lap of the gods.

We will let you know what we plan to do once we know more of what is going to happen.

PC

Next Meeting

Our next meeting will be on Monday 24th February at 7.30pm in our usual venue
where Jon Hampton, chair of Music in Salisbury and a good friend of our Society, will be presenting “From Art to Music – how great art has inspired great music”.

Jon will deliver a wide ranging survey of how great works of art have inspired composers to write great music with a few surprises in store.

I hope you will be able to attend.

Free parking outside the venue.  Only £3 for non-members.

Behold the sea …

It is perhaps not too surprising that an island nation should feature the sea in the compositions of its native composers.  Examples of these – from well known and some less well known composers – featured in the last meeting of the Society on 27 January 2020.

Society member Ed Tinline kicked of the second half of the season with a wide selection of pieces composed by British composers, all with the sea as their inspiration.

We started with part of Vaughan William’s Symphony No 1, A Sea Symphony composed in 1909.  Inspiration for the symphony came in part from Walt Whitman.  It was premiered when he was 38 and established him as a leading composer.

Brighton born Frank Bridge was next with his Symphonic Suite: The Sea composed in 1910.  Then a piece by Judith Weir with her Lament, Over the Sea from her The Bagpiper’s String Trio first performed in 1989.  Judith was the first woman to be appointed Master of the Queen’s Music.

Next – another woman – Ethyl Smyth with her Overture: The Wreckers from 1906.  I wrote ‘jaunty’ at one point with some interesting orchestral colours.  Dame Ethel Mary Smyth attained prominence as one of the most accomplished female composers in a male dominated environment, and as one of the main representatives of the suffragette movement.  Tchaikovsky said of her ‘[she] one of the few women composers whom one can seriously consider to be achieving something valuable in the field of musical creation’.  Source: British Library.

The first half ended with Arnold Bax’s On the Sea-shore And Elgar’s Sea Pictures.

The second half started with the unfamiliar Mass of the Sea composed by Paul Patterson composed in 1983.  Next was By the Sleepy Lagoon written at Selsey by Eric Coates – who like Frank Bridge, was born in Brighton – looking across the bay and is used as the theme for Desert Island Discs on Radio 4.

The Kent coast inspired David Matthew’s Overture: From Sea to Sky composed quite recently in 1992.  The Sea Interludes from Britten’s Peter Grimes are very familiar.  Interestingly, Britten was taught composition by Frank Bridge.

The penultimate piece was The Needles by Matthew Taylor commissioned by the LSE Music Society in 2000.  Finally we returned to Elgar and another of his Sea Pictures composed at the end of the nineteenth century.

A fascinating evening and a wide range of music based on this one idea.

Peter Curbishley


Next month’s meeting is Berlioz’s vocal music and is on Monday 10 February. 

 

Next meeting

The second half of the season kicks off on Monday 27 January with an evening devoted to the music of Vaughan Williams and other British composers .  Ed Tinline will present the evening entitled Behold the sea.

It starts at 7:30 and where to find us is on one of the tabs at the top of the site.  There is free parking outside and access is reasonable for those with disabilities (a small step).  £3 for non-members.  We look forward to seeing you.

PC

George Lloyd

George Lloyd was born in 1913 in St Ives (Cornwall) and had a traumatic life.  Both his parents were keen musicians and encouraged his talent from an early age.  Illness meant he was taught at home then left to continue his studies in London.

He wrote his first symphony at 19 which was premiered in Penzance.  We heard the Introduction,  Theme and Five Variations and it was music which showed great accomplishment.  Two other symphonies followed as well as two operas; The Serf and Lernin.  The latter was also first performed in Penzance before being transferred to London where it had an unusually long run.  Alan Forshaw, the presenter, played the Duet from the opera and it was an outstanding piece of music.

A crucial event in his life was joining the Marines as a bandsman and took part in the awful North Cape convoys to supply the Red Army in WWII.  A most terrible event took place in many of his fellow marines were drowned in fuel oil.  This affected his mental wellbeing and prolonged hospitalisation with what was still being called shellshock, now called PTSD.

It was physically difficult for him to write music because of the shaking but with devoted care from his wife he was able to start again.  A movement from a subsequent symphony demonstrated a change in style.

He wrote music for brass bands and one such was HMS Trinidad March, the ship he had served on.  He had almost no success with commissions from the BBC with his scores returned with no comment.  A member of the audience suggested this might have been the influence of William Glock and the pressure to use the 12 tone scale which Lloyd has little time for.

He quit the musical life and he and his wife opened a market garden in Dorset.  He began to be appreciated in later life and had some of his work performed at the Proms and he did well in America.  Albany Records recorded several of his works.  We heard a movement from the 4th Piano Concerto and a movement from the 6th Symphony.  Other pieces included extracts from the Requiem, and the Black Dyke Mills Band playing a memoriam following the IRA atrocity in the Royal parks.

For those of us who knew little of this composer’s work it was a revelation.  He had a sure touch when it came to orchestration.  I felt his style would have suited film music where he may have done well.  We were grateful to Alan for his work in preparing the evening.

Peter Curbishley


Please note we now have a page on Facebook – Salisbury recorded music society.

Next meeting on 28 October  

Next meeting

The next meeting will be on Monday 14 October at 7:30 as usual.  It will be a presentation by Alan Forshaw on the music of George Lloyd, probably a composer few have heard of.  He was born in St Ives, Cornwall and showed early talent.  He wrote twelve symphonies and four piano concertos.  His sixth symphony was performed at the Proms.   He was principal conductor for an orchestra in the United States.

He had a traumatic war experience in the navy.  We look forward to seeing you to hear more of the life and music of this composer.