November meeting

Details of the meeting to be held on Monday 8 November 2021

The next meeting will be on Monday 8th November when Alan Forshaw will present Listening to Beethoven in a different light.

We shall have an interval when we will offer tea or coffee, but you’re welcome to bring your own drink.  As before, we ask all attending to follow the Covid safety measures we have in place including signing in and sanitising procedures on arrival, well spaced seating, wearing a mask, minimising moving around and maintaining social distancing. 

On 22nd November we shall have a Members’ Evening. If you have a piece on CD of around 10 minutes that you would like to bring and have played at the meeting, please would you let us have details, if possible this Monday so we can draw up a play list.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Meeting tonight

The next meeting is tonight, Monday 25th October, when Ed Tinline will be presenting: Harmony around the Baltic

He hopes you’ll be able to join him on a musical journey around some of the Baltic countries, enjoying pieces by local composers including Jean Sibelius,  Arvo Pärt, Hugo Alvén, and others.

We shall have an interval when we will be able to offer tea or coffee, but you’re welcome to bring your own drink.  As before, we ask all attending to follow the Covid safety measures we have in place including signing in and sanitising procedures on arrival, well spaced seating, wearing a mask, minimising moving around and maintaining social distancing. 

Copies of the full programme for the season will be available at the meeting.

However please would you note that while the dates of coming meetings are unchanged we have had to alter the running order in November. The amended programme up to Christmas is now:

  • On 8th November  Alan Forshaw will present ‘Listening to Beethoven in a different light’.
  • And then on 22nd November we shall have a Members’ Evening. If you have a piece of around 10 minutes that you would like bring and have played please let a committee member know.

Our final meeting before Christmas will be on 6th December 2021 when Ruth Barlow will present ‘Classical Music in Animations’ and invite us to join her in an end of term scamper  through some cartoons with great classical music, including considering whether Fantasia was Mickey Mouse’s finest hour and listening to Tom and Jerry playing Liszt.

We hope you will be able to come on Monday 25th  October at 7.30 and to feel comfortable with the arrangements we plan to have in place.

We’re restarting!

We were planning to restart but new government restrictions and the rule of 6 has meant – along with many other organisations – we are unable to do so.  Various ideas are being looked at and the committee has a meeting this Friday (18 September) to look at options.  So for now, it means we shall not be restarting.

Previous post no longer valid.

[We shall be restarting on 5th October at a new venue!  This will enable us to meet Covid 19 requirements.  Details later today!]

New season starting

We hope to restart meetings in the Autumn

We need hardly note that the programme at the start of this year had to be abandoned so it is with pleasure that – tentatively at least – we hope to restart in the Autumn with a programme up to Christmas.  The first session will be on Monday 21 September and will be  The Legend of Orpheus and the Birth of Opera by Jeremy Barlow.

Starting at 7:30 as usual and at the usual place which if you haven’t been before is at the rear of the Guide’s Centre in St Ann St.  By car go down to the end of Exeter St and left before the roundabout into Carmalite Way.  Then left and almost back to St Ann St and there are some green gates on the left into a free car park.  Access is easy for those with disabilities.

It is a modest £3 for non-members.

Please keep an eye on this site or on Facebook in case we have to cancel.

Once we have finalised the remaining evenings we will post the full programme here.

Look forward to seeing you or welcoming new members in September!

Peter Curbishley

 

 

Next Meeting

Our next meeting will be on Monday 24th February at 7.30pm in our usual venue
where Jon Hampton, chair of Music in Salisbury and a good friend of our Society, will be presenting “From Art to Music – how great art has inspired great music”.

Jon will deliver a wide ranging survey of how great works of art have inspired composers to write great music with a few surprises in store.

I hope you will be able to attend.

Free parking outside the venue.  Only £3 for non-members.

Next meeting – the trumpet

The next meeting of the Salisbury Recorded Music Society will be held on Monday 1st April 2019 at 7.30pm in our usual venue, when Ed Tinline will be presenting  The trumpet (and other brass) shall sound – a focus on the brass section from Handel onwards.  Given the date, although it will be a bit late in the day for tricks as such, Ed hopes to include a little musical humour during the evening.

We hope to see you on Monday.

Second half gets underway

The second half of the season gets underway on Monday 4th February at 7:30 as usual with a presentation on organ music.  We have not had such a presentation in recent years (if at all) and yet there is a large corpus of music written for this ‘king of instruments’.  The music will included works in the 17th century and some written in modern times.  At least one recording was made with the Cathedral’s organ.

Hope to see you there.

Elgar

The next meeting of the Society on 12 November, is about the great British composer, Elgar

We shall be very pleased to welcome Duncan Eves from the Elgar Society, who will be presenting: Elgar – Orchestral Genius.

We look forward to seeing you on Monday.  If you are not a member, the entrance fee is £3 for the evening.  Parking is right outside and is free.

New season kicks off

The new season of the Recorded Music Society kicked off with a flying start with a presentation by Tony Powell entitled One Composer’s journey into silence and then resignation.  He was of course referring to Beethoven who, as is well known, became progressively deaf starting at quite a young age in his 20’s.  By 1816 he had lost nearly all his hearing and visitors had to write down what they wanted to say.

This clearly had a traumatic effect on his musical life.  He was a fine pianist and conductor so he was no longer able to do these things.  Even though the music was in his imagination, not to be able to hear what he had composed was a heavy burden to bear.

Tony attempted to take us through his musical life, starting with the youthful compositions and ending with some of the last completed pieces.  It might be tempting to use the major pieces – the symphonies or concertos for example – but instead he chose the smaller scaled compositions: piano trios; ‘cello sonatas; string quartets and piano sonatas.  These are often give a truer insight into a composer’s ‘soul’ if you will, and are harder to compose.  Some may be surprised at this but even composers like Mozart, who could dash off pieces seemingly at will, found the shorter forms harder to complete sometimes taking months.

The big change in the piano trios Tony explained, between Beethoven and the earlier composers, was the role played by the other two instruments.  With Haydn, they were in support of the piano, in the Beethoven’s work, they played an equal role.  This was particularly evident with Op 1 in G Major composed in 1795 when he was in his 20’s.

The style changed and in Op 70 No 2 composed in 1808 we see a greater intensity.  Events in Europe would no doubt had a role to play, in particular the French Revolution and the increase in enlightenment thinking.

He only wrote 5 ‘cello sonatas and we heard extracts from Op 5; Op 69 and Op 102, again a spread through his lifetime showing stylistic changes between 1797 and 1815.

Next to the string quartets and if you were not a Beethoven scholar and heard string quartet No 6 in B flat Op 18, you might be forgiven in thinking it was a piece by Haydn.  The jaunty theme and structure of the quartet typical of that composer.  You would not make that mistake with the last completed quartet (by Beethoven) No 16 Op 135 composed in 1826 the year before he died.

The piano sonatas were a compositional form Beethoven was most comfortable with, possibly because of his piano playing background.  We heard extracts from three: No 1; No 23 (Appassionata) and No 32.  The increase in intensity and complexity was most marked.

This was a most interesting presentation, showing the changing style of Beethoven’s work over his life.  No doubt events in his life – revolution, the Napoleonic wars for example played their part – but his retreat into an inner life would also have been a powerful influence.

Peter Curbishley


Next meeting 1 October at 7:30 as usual