Meeting tonight

The next meeting is tonight, Monday 25th October, when Ed Tinline will be presenting: Harmony around the Baltic

He hopes you’ll be able to join him on a musical journey around some of the Baltic countries, enjoying pieces by local composers including Jean Sibelius,  Arvo Pärt, Hugo Alvén, and others.

We shall have an interval when we will be able to offer tea or coffee, but you’re welcome to bring your own drink.  As before, we ask all attending to follow the Covid safety measures we have in place including signing in and sanitising procedures on arrival, well spaced seating, wearing a mask, minimising moving around and maintaining social distancing. 

Copies of the full programme for the season will be available at the meeting.

However please would you note that while the dates of coming meetings are unchanged we have had to alter the running order in November. The amended programme up to Christmas is now:

  • On 8th November  Alan Forshaw will present ‘Listening to Beethoven in a different light’.
  • And then on 22nd November we shall have a Members’ Evening. If you have a piece of around 10 minutes that you would like bring and have played please let a committee member know.

Our final meeting before Christmas will be on 6th December 2021 when Ruth Barlow will present ‘Classical Music in Animations’ and invite us to join her in an end of term scamper  through some cartoons with great classical music, including considering whether Fantasia was Mickey Mouse’s finest hour and listening to Tom and Jerry playing Liszt.

We hope you will be able to come on Monday 25th  October at 7.30 and to feel comfortable with the arrangements we plan to have in place.

Re restarting

Zoom meeting planned

After the problems which we are all aware of, we were unable to restart earlier this month but the committee has been active in thinking up a solution.  So, on the 5th October at 7:30 pm, we shall be doing an experiment with Zoom and YouTube built around some early work by Sibelius.

This is an experiment of course and members are invited to get in touch with Committee member Ruth for details and the necessary links.  If you haven’t used Zoom before, it’s quite easy if you follow some fairly straightforward steps.  YouTube is likewise pretty easy.  You will need a little camera for your pc if that is your system: laptops and Apple machines have one installed, not all monitors do.  They are cheap at under £30 and you just plug it in.

You might need to ‘mute’ when someone is speaking because interference or noise builds up if you don’t.   Hover over the bottom of the screen and a microphone symbol will appear and you can ‘mute’ or ‘unmute’ by clicking it.

We look forward to as many of our members as possible joining this innovative solution in these troubled times.

Sibelius Concert notice

Those members who came to the first meeting this year given by our chair Ed Tinline might like to know there is a live follow up, in Salisbury, to his presentation in September of Music from a Sibelius 150th Anniversary Festival!

Sibelius
Sibelius

Folke Gräsbeck (two of whose recordings he included in his programme) will be giving a piano recital on Wednesday 4th November at 7.30pm in St Martin’s Church, Salisbury.

 The publicity for the event says
Finnish pianist Folke Gräsbeck has recorded much of Sibelius’s piano music for Scandinavian record label BIS’s Sibelius Complete Edition, including a well-reviewed recital on the composer’s own piano at his home Ainola.
The programme is still to be confirmed in detail, but will feature several more well known pieces such as valse triste and may well include some UK premières of Sibelius’s lesser known piano works. 
Ticket Prices:  £10 available at the door

New season gets underway

The new season started well last night with a presentation by Ed Tinline of the

Sibelius

music of Sibelius.  His music is familiar enough of course and it got a good hearing at this year’s proms concerts in honour of his 150th anniversary.  He is Finland’s most famous composer although curiously, he spoke Swedish – a reflection of that country’s complex history.

Ed had just returned from Lahti in Finland where he attended the anniversary festival there.  He selected for the Society music played at that festival which mixed familiar works with several less well known.  It is often a curious fact that even top flight composers have a body of work which may seldom if ever be heard.  This might be because it received a poor review when it was first performed or because the composer was unhappy with it and it was ‘withdrawn’.

The evening started with a performance of the Wood Nymph from 1894 performed by the Lahti Symphony Orchestra under Otto Vänskä in a world premier recording made in 1996, that is a century after it was composed.  At 21 minutes it was quite long but contained much interesting and delightful music.  It is a mystery why Sibelius never arranged for its publication but it might be because he was unsure of its merit.

After the second movement of Symphony No 3 we heard two songs sung by Lilli Paassikivi: Since then I have questioned no further and Astray from a set of songs opus 17.

Another rarely heard piece was Oceanides a ‘Rondo of the Waves’ by the same orchestra and conductor, recorded in 2003.  Originally written in D Flat major, Sibelius transcribed it into D major for its first performance in the States because of the difficulty for the strings in playing it in the original key.  It was favourably received.

We also heard the fourth movement from the familiar Symphony No 6 under Otto Kamu recorded last year and the evening finished with Andante Festivo op 34 performed by Tempera String Quartet.

The next evening is on October 5th.

Salisbury Journal